The State of Digital Music: The Rdio Conversations

Rhett C Thanks JP, that does clarfiy the Diaspora idea. I also had high expectations for Google+, and I’m curious to see if they can reclaim their momentum or we are just seeing Orkut v3 in the making.

Lacey, consider yourself fortunate for having legit choices when it comes to an ISP. Outside of major markets, though, there is often one gig in town.

I”m a little confused that your seemingly against net neutraility because the ISPs are ‘dishonoring’ the spirit the of the subsidies. So because of this they should be allowed to censor the Internet?

Just as the electric company shouldn’t make me pay more depending on how I use my kilowatts, I shouldn’t pay more for how I use my packets. Besides paying more for access to a site is one thing, what about an ISP cutting off Rdio because they signed an exclusive with Spotify? This is still an internet where a little idea can turn into great things, but if ISPs are able to manipulate throughput so that the burgeoning new services run like molasses while their sweetheart service runs like a scalded dog, then we are really talking about the demise of competition and darker days for consumers. 4 weeks ago

Nohbdy @LU: that’s the problem, Net neutrality is just the tip of the iceberg. If the ISP’s had there way you wouldn’t get to shop around they want to carve it up and have there own captive consumer pool that they can railroad into accepting any terms they set. Think phone companies before deregulation. Oh and do you like the data and surfing limits on your phone? They want to do that for regular internet browsing also. I agree with Rhett. If you’re worried about anyone on the internet putting you under their heel then you should be worried about the large ISP companies trying to put you there. 4 weeks ago

Lacey Underall Heh. Is it my turn to play devil’s advocate? Because honestly, I’m not that concerned about net neutrality.

If I use ESPN a lot, then it seems like me having to pay to access the site is a fair and open exchange. If I feel like my ISP is trying to skim too much off the top, I can find a different ISP. There’s plenty of them. And people will not hesitate to shop ISP’s because the price they pay is real money and that’s easier to understand. You are (for now) a client of your ISP and not the product.

The major reason I’m against net neutrality is that the government gave companies major subsidies to hook everyone up and get the backbone set up. And they got these subsidies and local monopolies because they told the government how great the internet was and how it was going to be this big global village. Now they’re trying to say it’s NOT a big global village, it’s *their* property and they’re using the power they got through unfair competition to turn the screws. That bothers me.

But if the competition were fair and I could shop amongst a big array of ISP’s, I wouldn’t have a problem with net un-neutrality at all. 4 weeks ago

Jason Paul @Tod I think @Rhett is our guy 🙂

@Rhett I’m trying to keep up with your impressive understanding of how all this stuff works. My own interest in Diaspora and open source is probably more idiosyncratic. I’m as of yet not all that concerned about privacy where social networks are concerned. I’m a data packrat. I’ve paid for my own hosting for a decade and I feel a compulsive need to keep these online records of myself.

I think there’s a misunderstanding about the mission of something like Diaspora. Because the idea came out strong and tapped into privacy fears about Facebook the impression is that it’s a replacement for Facebook. It can be that but it’s really intended as the space between all social networks. The promise is that it can be a connector/pipeline and archiver of all your networks on the web. The bonus is that it’s something you can install yourself on your own server where you’re responsible for all your social data (if you want it to be, i understand hosting your own pod is not easy).

3 thoughts on “The State of Digital Music: The Rdio Conversations”

  1. Great post and comments!

    Right. So… Is Rdio the Future of Music?

    The problem with these sorts of “x is the future of y” discussions, particularly where technology is concerned, is that x always changes the nature of y. Because of this, you can never quite arrive at point y.

    I see Rdio and it’s ilk bumping into a few issues shortly that run along these lines:

    1) The closer these services get to delivering on the promise of offering “almost everything” in the world of music, the more they will underscore what isn’t offered. Put another way, how much music needs to be available to make up for the fact that what you want to hear right now isn’t?

    2) Part of the appeal of these services lies in the social aspect, which presently is built on the enthusiasm of early adopters and music nerds. The tone and quality of the social interaction will change as more users sign on. Will Rdio still be compelling?

    3) Rdio is presently a novel way of trying to monetize music in a time where monetizing music is difficult. It’s an experiment that is occurring concurrently with other experiments at trying to resuscitate the monetization of music. A verdict will be reached. Recent high profile releases by Coldplay, Black Keys, Tom Waits — to name a few — are not present on Rdio. Presumably this is because posting on streaming services is viewed as possibly undermining the success of other channels, both experimental and traditional. Is this the start of a verdict being reached? Will this assessment be shared by others?

    Just a few thoughts.

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