The State of Digital Music: The Rdio Conversations

Oh and Diaspora, like FB, also offers 3rd party app developers an OAuth API for accessing users’ data. That’s akin to the controversial shared login feature used by FB. Personally, I don’t think federated authentication is irresponsible, there are use cases where it makes sense to use it as the only authentication mechanism. Oh and the Rdio API, also using OAuth. Why is it just a problem when FB offers it? Is it because unlike the other services, FB has enough momentum that we regularly see apps that use their OAuth services?

Myself, as a user, recognize that I am responsible for the terms of every agreement I hit the accept button on, whether or not I chose to read them is a conscious decision. When I ignore the fine print in a privacy policy, I know that I’m in the dark about what’s going to happen. No matter how transparent an organization is, unless they pump their policies directly into our brains many consumers will pass over the opportunity to clue themselves in. That said, not all policy documents are created equal, but Facebook and Rdio are way above average when it comes to human-readable (as in not lawyer) terms.

What about the cost of providing these free servers? Spend a few minutes fishing up those numbers.

The benevolent open-source developers are fantastic. I have enjoyed contributing to open-source projects in the past, it’s satisfying. At the same time, we all have bills to pay, the money has to come from somewhere. And consider that the less effective the advertising the more you can expect to see. 4 weeks ago

tod nelson @Jason Paul. Let’s find that guy! I was thinking the same thing. 4 weeks ago

Rob Treynor Of course, there were those 2 weeks where my top scrobble was Redd Foxx. 4 weeks ago

Biker Chick and… you have to listen to the majority if not the whole song for it to show up in last.fm. So you can skip through a bad discovery and the only memory of it is the one you have stuck in your brain. 4 weeks ago

Rob Treynor I’m late to this party, but have been reading these comments for the last couple of days. First, let me say to Jason Paul that I enjoyed your blog, even if you dissed the always-excellent “You Gotta Wash Your Ass.” (Why isn’t that still #1?). I’ve been paranoid of Facebook apps from the onset, and have kept them turned off mainly as a courtesy to all of the people in my friends list. Just because I may want to water a virtual tobacco plantation shouldn’t mean the game makers should have the same access as I do to my friends. However, enough of my friends play with Mafiaville or Scrabblous or whatnot, that my personal information has been compromised dozens of times with only the consent of my friends’ and not mine. I try to block the apps when I become aware of them, but that becomes tedious. Anyway, that all changed with the new social apps and rdio being able to show up in the new timeline. Part of me, the part that enjoys blazing the trail of listening to new music before my friends, wants to tout what I’m listening to. But I’ve now realized that I listen to a LOT of crap before finding the good stuff on here. What I realize now is that the Rdio/timeline integration shows all of my friends all of the crap I’m listening to throughout the day. There’s no way of focusing my tastes with the timeline. Unlike Last.fm. And while last.fm doesn’t do as good of a job as it used to with social interaction, it STILL allows one to get an excellent look at one’s musical taste. Crompton doesn’t see the difference, but what facebook ONLY shows is a snapshot of that moment. (“Ah. Rob’s listening to Right Said Fred right now. He must be drunk”)….wheras last.fm shows whether I listen to Right Said Fred all of the time or if it was just a momentary lapse in judgement. 4 weeks ago

Jason Paul I think the icing on the cake would be for some benevelent developer to use Rdio’s open API and do a similar integration with Diaspora that was done with FB. Wish I was that guy. 4 weeks ago

3 thoughts on “The State of Digital Music: The Rdio Conversations”

  1. Great post and comments!

    Right. So… Is Rdio the Future of Music?

    The problem with these sorts of “x is the future of y” discussions, particularly where technology is concerned, is that x always changes the nature of y. Because of this, you can never quite arrive at point y.

    I see Rdio and it’s ilk bumping into a few issues shortly that run along these lines:

    1) The closer these services get to delivering on the promise of offering “almost everything” in the world of music, the more they will underscore what isn’t offered. Put another way, how much music needs to be available to make up for the fact that what you want to hear right now isn’t?

    2) Part of the appeal of these services lies in the social aspect, which presently is built on the enthusiasm of early adopters and music nerds. The tone and quality of the social interaction will change as more users sign on. Will Rdio still be compelling?

    3) Rdio is presently a novel way of trying to monetize music in a time where monetizing music is difficult. It’s an experiment that is occurring concurrently with other experiments at trying to resuscitate the monetization of music. A verdict will be reached. Recent high profile releases by Coldplay, Black Keys, Tom Waits — to name a few — are not present on Rdio. Presumably this is because posting on streaming services is viewed as possibly undermining the success of other channels, both experimental and traditional. Is this the start of a verdict being reached? Will this assessment be shared by others?

    Just a few thoughts.

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