The State of Digital Music: The Rdio Conversations

Allows for collection and list creation, lacking I think a rating system. 4 weeks ago

Jason Paul @tod my main issue with Facebook is that we have no control of that landscape. They do whatever they want and we have to like it. And it’s often invasive and if you’re not paying attention your privacy will be compromised. Here’s another POV that is less alarmist and more realistic about why we need to be concerned about how information is presented to us through FB and Google: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WLXa1kEMooU (it’s a TED talk) 4 weeks ago

Biker Chick Yes, I don’t like how if I am on just about any site, my FB account is already aware and the comment box is waiting at the bottom. 4 weeks ago

unhillbilly Sharing is wonderful, but ideally, I’d like to know what I’m sharing and with whom. The more transparent a web property is about that, the more likely I’ll trust and use it. Having FB follow me on every site with their stalking technology enabled without any way to turn it off just seems beyond skeezy.

@JP interesting article. If FB becomes the de-facto log-in for the internet, surveillance would get a lot simpler for the FBI, NSA, CIA, HSA, and likely foreign entities as well.

Obligatory demotivational FB poster http://goo.gl/z1KnT

@gRetChEn I’d be sad if last.fm disappeared. It’s fairly easy to find how many times I played a particular artist or song. I use it to generate a shopping list. And I’ve no issue with having any of that be public.

4 weeks ago

tod nelson This is becoming the first thing I check out when I log onto Rdio. The discussion here is incredible and all the different pov.s are great. Thanks for kicking things off, Jason Paul.

And thanks for sharing the Guardian article. I thought it was very interesting, but ultimately I have to ask regarding Facebook: So what? I may be naive or completely missing something, but I just don’t understand what people are afraid of. What’s the worst FB can do with all the information they gather on their users? Mostly it seems to me that they use it to sell targeted advertising. In trade for that info, we get to use an incredibly powerful communication tool. And they have never even once asked for my credit card #. How am I a “product being used” by a corporation? I think FB users are more resources than products, and it seems like a pretty fair trade off: my info (which I am in control of) for their product (which I use as I see fit). 4 weeks ago

Joseph Thornton I like it sharing. Isn’t it just like last.fm??

http://www.last.fm/user/jtjdt 4 weeks ago

GrEtcHen @Nohbdy, it’s a good thing, not a bad thing, that they provide the “more” link and collapse them by default. The volume of info could be overwhelming otherwise.

I haven’t been able to understand how the listens are organized beyond that. I’ll see Turd’s listens from days ago at the top, but someone else’s newer listens further down. Do you know what that’s all about? 4 weeks ago

Nohbdy @BC: You know I’ve looked at my rdio posts on my wife’s profile. Here’s what I saw: 1 post that had a rotating list of songs on it that as I listened to a new one the oldest was removed. You could see the history only if you clicked on the see more link. this one post continues to be updated as i listen over several days. Does this constitute over sharing? it seems less intrusive than most other apps I can think of. 4 weeks ago

GrEtcHen @LU, I know of two other groups from Lala hanging out elsewhere on the ‘net. I couldn’t convince one of these groups to try Rdio. “Why would I want that?” But yeah, when Spotify rolled out, they were all “ooo!” I just had to shake my head. Crompsy knows the other crew, they did the same thing to him.

I suspect it’s residual bias from when Lala did some things both groups did not like, one of them being moving from cd trading to streaming model. I can relate to emotional bias against sites (FB!!!), I empathize.

3 thoughts on “The State of Digital Music: The Rdio Conversations”

  1. Great post and comments!

    Right. So… Is Rdio the Future of Music?

    The problem with these sorts of “x is the future of y” discussions, particularly where technology is concerned, is that x always changes the nature of y. Because of this, you can never quite arrive at point y.

    I see Rdio and it’s ilk bumping into a few issues shortly that run along these lines:

    1) The closer these services get to delivering on the promise of offering “almost everything” in the world of music, the more they will underscore what isn’t offered. Put another way, how much music needs to be available to make up for the fact that what you want to hear right now isn’t?

    2) Part of the appeal of these services lies in the social aspect, which presently is built on the enthusiasm of early adopters and music nerds. The tone and quality of the social interaction will change as more users sign on. Will Rdio still be compelling?

    3) Rdio is presently a novel way of trying to monetize music in a time where monetizing music is difficult. It’s an experiment that is occurring concurrently with other experiments at trying to resuscitate the monetization of music. A verdict will be reached. Recent high profile releases by Coldplay, Black Keys, Tom Waits — to name a few — are not present on Rdio. Presumably this is because posting on streaming services is viewed as possibly undermining the success of other channels, both experimental and traditional. Is this the start of a verdict being reached? Will this assessment be shared by others?

    Just a few thoughts.

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