The State of Digital Music: The Rdio Conversations

And forget about social features on Spotify. It baffles me how they pride themselves on that since the social features are nowhere near as good as Rdio. Yea, it connects with Facebook, yay. Everything does now and I’m honestly tired of that. Like most have said, I don’t want to know what a lot of my Facebook friends are listening to, because I know that most of them listen to music that I’m not into 🙂 Rdio allows me to find people based on artists/albums/songs that I dig and before you know it you’ve discovered awesome listeners along with their awesome taste in music.

Rdio has been responsible for most of the new music I’ve found this year and with a beautiful design, a catalog that continues to grow, and a team of support that are great to deal with, I don’t see myself switching to MOG, Spotify, or any of the others. And I’ve tried them, and I genuinely wanted to like Spotify. Rdio is the hype, Spotify is not. 4 months ago

Jason Paul That’s kind of interesting that some early reports of Spotify on this thread seem to suggest Rdio is better. Maybe Spotify will be a boon for Rdio. I’m not paying though, gonna wait for the invite. 4 months ago

Joseph Thornton I’m not feelin’ Spotify at all. The social features are very lacking. 4 months ago

GrEtcHen Turd, does that limitation affect the Spotify mobile app too? 4 months ago

Lacey Underall The lala discussion is quite interesting. I was on lala but never did anything with it. I was a big WOXY listener when lala bought them. And I was always sort of mad at lala for buying the station and never doing anything with it.

WOXY on lala never made sense to me when I saw the direction lala was going. I mean, on the on hand, you have lala’s model of destroying the whole taste-maker, top-down model like K Rom mentioned. And then on the other side you have WOXY as a radio station, which is a prime example of just that.

I think you need both. You need a WOXY that will spin you what’s cool in indie today to jerk you out your comfort zone, and to provide a larger musical context/backdrop, so that we have something shared to talk about. But you also need the option to go off and find stuff you like for yourself.

I don’t think Bill N. ever figured out how to bridge the gap. Quite honestly, I don’t think Bill N. really gets the “new social” himself, as witnessed by the Color debacle. Not that he isn’t for sure a technical genius, and a generally crazy smat guy over all. It’s a slippery concept is all. The rules and patterns for the new social interactions are still being made. 4 months ago

Matt Marine Yeah, the more I look at it, the more I like Rdio. For promoting such a large number of songs, they’re actually missing a lot of the stuff I like on Rdio. And for promoting the social angle, it really works as a social angle to the people you’re already friends with. 4 months ago

Turd Ferguson Good point Gretchen. iCould will definitely be affordable for larger collections. I still hope for an iTunes streaming service so I can stream the thousands of dollars of DRM protected music that I purchased from them in the early days. 4 months ago

GrEtcHen On the thumbs down side, one editor at CNET reports if he uses Spotify on his work computer, it will not play tunes from his collection located on his home computer. So it looks like that “integration” only works on the computer with access to those local files.

I wonder how that would work with a collection stored in a cloud service? hmm… 4 months ago

Qat I stand in awe of those whose eloquence I can never hope to attain. 4 months ago

GrEtcHen Looks like Spotify has private playlists. Personally, I have such a supremely enormous ego, I simply don’t care what you think about what I listen to. (Exactly why I scrobble too — doesn’t everyone want to know my listening habits? Sure you do! Let me help you.) But for the sensitive and inexplicably shy among you, I know this is desirable. 4 months ago

3 thoughts on “The State of Digital Music: The Rdio Conversations”

  1. Great post and comments!

    Right. So… Is Rdio the Future of Music?

    The problem with these sorts of “x is the future of y” discussions, particularly where technology is concerned, is that x always changes the nature of y. Because of this, you can never quite arrive at point y.

    I see Rdio and it’s ilk bumping into a few issues shortly that run along these lines:

    1) The closer these services get to delivering on the promise of offering “almost everything” in the world of music, the more they will underscore what isn’t offered. Put another way, how much music needs to be available to make up for the fact that what you want to hear right now isn’t?

    2) Part of the appeal of these services lies in the social aspect, which presently is built on the enthusiasm of early adopters and music nerds. The tone and quality of the social interaction will change as more users sign on. Will Rdio still be compelling?

    3) Rdio is presently a novel way of trying to monetize music in a time where monetizing music is difficult. It’s an experiment that is occurring concurrently with other experiments at trying to resuscitate the monetization of music. A verdict will be reached. Recent high profile releases by Coldplay, Black Keys, Tom Waits — to name a few — are not present on Rdio. Presumably this is because posting on streaming services is viewed as possibly undermining the success of other channels, both experimental and traditional. Is this the start of a verdict being reached? Will this assessment be shared by others?

    Just a few thoughts.

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