The State of Digital Music: The Rdio Conversations

Driggs I love adding songs to amplify snarky comments through playlists – Gretchen will never know #7 was for her, and CN won’t know #10 is for him.

…or at least until I start bragging about it 🙂

It’s a good side benefit to having to lurk in the comments of a playlist to discuss anything here 4 months ago

Biker Chick Thank goodness for lastfm. Seriously, it has been the one constant through all of the drama. It is also accessible from outside of the US. Which.. as someone who will be residing outside of the US next year.. means a great deal to me. If I cannot stalk ermmmm… I mean follow some of “yinz” through Rdio or any other site I can still glean and pillage your scrobbles! 4 months ago

Crippling Niles I like to think that I’d be “as social” regardless of the library size. Random pecking at new releases can only get one so far, and having other like-minded individuals doing the same thing covers more ground and gets me to desireable results more quickly.

As far as avoiding the pigeonhole of any one particular genre goes, I would hope that this would be averted by having friends who also listen to different things. That way, as soon as I start to get too caught up in the indie scene, one of my metalhead friends will throw something at me and totally change my direction…or even change my mind about how I thought of something before.

I guess it comes down to your individual listening habits too. If someone came at me from out of nowhere proclaiming the greatness of the new Justin Bieber album, it probably wouldn’t send me running for the headphones regardless of how that message was communicated (i.e. e mail, Rdio, telephone, open-handed slap to the face). I mean, I guess something like a 12 gauge would motivate me a little, but still… 4 months ago

Jason Paul @K Rom I wish I could ‘Like’ comments cause you’re dropping some gems 4 months ago

K Rom Forgive me for the tangent, but can I just say I find it offensive that Spotify tries to sell itself with blurbs from Mark Zuckerberg and… wait for it… Demi Moore. Why the f*ck am I supposed to give a sh*t what two people who have nothing to do with music think? Because they’re… famous? What kind of InTouch Weekly universe are these halfwits living in? Kind of shows you what demographic they’re aiming for. 4 months ago

Turd Ferguson Last week we just had another family over as a play date for our kids. Turns out the Dad and I had the similar musical tastes and we spent all night spinning tunes and drinking. We had a great time. We are now going to hit The Pixies show together when they visit NJ. This is the first in person music experience I have had for the longest time without the influence of a music site. I did meet other Moggers at a concert a few months back but that materialized on line. 4 months ago

Jason Paul @Gretchen trust me I am loving the attention. Although I’m having trouble keeping up. Forgive me if I don’t jump back in for a few hours (werkin!) 4 months ago

Lacey Underall If you had a gigantic library of tunes– enough to last you a lifetime– at your disposal would that make you *more* social about music or less? Genuine question.

You might be content to simply have your 10,000 song collection of what amounts to “classic rock” and listen to that on shuffle and never listen to much new music again. Or you might hang out with a few people with similar tastes and get deeper into indie rock/pop than you ever thought possible, and yet miss out on some good hip-hop stuff because you’re no longer hanging out with hip-hop listeners.

It’s cool that people hundreds or thousands of miles apart can interact via turntbl or Rdio. On the other hand, people seem to share less musical experiences in physical settings. Like if you and I are hanging out, but you’re listening to your iPhone and I’m listening to my iPhone…. didn’t we just get a lot LESS social about music?

3 thoughts on “The State of Digital Music: The Rdio Conversations”

  1. Great post and comments!

    Right. So… Is Rdio the Future of Music?

    The problem with these sorts of “x is the future of y” discussions, particularly where technology is concerned, is that x always changes the nature of y. Because of this, you can never quite arrive at point y.

    I see Rdio and it’s ilk bumping into a few issues shortly that run along these lines:

    1) The closer these services get to delivering on the promise of offering “almost everything” in the world of music, the more they will underscore what isn’t offered. Put another way, how much music needs to be available to make up for the fact that what you want to hear right now isn’t?

    2) Part of the appeal of these services lies in the social aspect, which presently is built on the enthusiasm of early adopters and music nerds. The tone and quality of the social interaction will change as more users sign on. Will Rdio still be compelling?

    3) Rdio is presently a novel way of trying to monetize music in a time where monetizing music is difficult. It’s an experiment that is occurring concurrently with other experiments at trying to resuscitate the monetization of music. A verdict will be reached. Recent high profile releases by Coldplay, Black Keys, Tom Waits — to name a few — are not present on Rdio. Presumably this is because posting on streaming services is viewed as possibly undermining the success of other channels, both experimental and traditional. Is this the start of a verdict being reached? Will this assessment be shared by others?

    Just a few thoughts.

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